Project Sansar: The Big Bad Wolf?

Project Sansar June 2015Change is scary. The more some people hear about Project Sansar, the more panicky they get.

I get it. Some people can handle change better than others. In RL, I work in Human Resources, and change is an integral part of my job, and if I couldn’t deal with change, I would be in the wrong job. I mean seriously, I could tell you stories….

But I digress.

Second Life residents are worried about many things. Will SL still be here? Will Linden Lab still support SL once Project Sansar is open? Will the new platform be for me? What if the new platform requires a high powered computer and I don’t have money for that, let alone an expensive VR headset!! Will SL become a ghost town with only those poor and lame enough to not have powerful computers? What if…what if….

It seems to me that most people see Second Life and Project Sansar as apples and apples, when really they are more like apples and bananas. I mean, think about it. I think there is enough people to allow the fruit section to expand.

It’s like this. There was a produce section at the grocery store, and for many years, the only produce in the section were apples. The apples were very happy being king of the produce section, and they profited greatly, with only a few consumers of the apples going to other, smaller produce stands to purchase their apples. The apples were happily the only produce available in this store. However, the grocery store started to get bored and wanted to know if there might be another kind of fruit that would add some variety to the produce section, so the grocery store announced they were going to introduce bananas. Signs went up at the store… “Coming soon! Bananas! Whee!”

Consumers panicked. They freaked out! They picketed the store. They chanted, They blogged. “Save Our Apples!” they cried. The grocery store reassured consumers that the apples would still be there, but still the consumers worried and fretted. Would the apples still be the same? Would they be able to get the apples they wanted, or would the apple variety be reduced to make room for bananas?? Much hand-wringing and anguish occurred. Some consumers threatened to go to other grocery stores and fruit stands. Some consumers just stopped buying apples.

Others continued to buy apples and enjoy the apples as they had for many years, not worrying about it. Consumers were encouraged to visit other grocery stores, where their produce section had many varieties of fruits and vegetables, all happily living side by side, as consumers pick and choose which fruit and vegetables they wanted, and not one fruit or vegetable suffered from slumping sales when a variety was being offered. Indeed, in other stores where a variety of produce was offered, sales often soared of the apples when bananas were introduced, because it drew a larger number of consumers to the store, and sometimes those people chose apples instead of the bananas they had originally come for.

Clearly there is room for both SL and Project Sansar. They appear to be, at this point, apples and bananas not apples and high tech apples. They are similar, but not the same. Maybe a better example would be that Second Life are Red Delicious and Project Sansar are Fuji apples. There is room enough for both varieties, because not everyone wants the same variety.

As I tell my staff in RL, ask yourself, “Does getting upset about this change anything?” There is nothing we can do. Linden Lab is moving forward with Project Sansar, and we can either embrace the change or we can reject it. We can be part of the problem, or part of the solution. Once we realize that this change is inevitable, let’s embrace Second Life and keep it vital, alive, and growing. The only people responsible for making Second Life a wonderful place to be, are the residents. We, the content creators and consumers, performers, artists and all that makes Second Life rich and vital, are the ones that can continue to make it this way. Will Project Sansar be for you? Maybe, maybe not. Maybe Project Sansar is the Mercedes of the virtual world platforms, and Second Life is the Toyota. Not everyone can afford a Mercedes, but that doesn’t mean that we stop driving or don’t buy a car just because we can’t afford a Mercedes.

There is a rich and varied technological world out there, and there is room for both Second Life and Project Sansar. If Second Life fails, it will not be because Linden Lab didn’t support it; it will be because the residents didn’t believe in it enough to keep it vital.

Don’t throttle back creating, don’t stand still and refuse to move forward out of fear that Project Sansar will eclipse Second Life. Don’t run around saying the sky is falling when in reality, it is just another star in the galaxy.

There are some wonderful blog posts about Second Life and Project Sansar. I’ve included links below:

Canary Beck: Are Second Life Residents Anxious About Project Sansar?

Inara Pey: The Sansar Summary

I remain respectfully yours,
~ Suzanne Piers, ZoHa Islands Blogger/Social Media

VR Gear

I saw a photo on the Second Life Facebook page of someone wearing VR gear and a headset for chatting. This all looks very cumbersome and heavy to me. It reminds me of the early days of cell phones.

VR headset

Don’t you know that someday, we will look back at this picture and shake our heads, saying “Oh can you believe we ever had to wear something that clunky???” I mean just look at the evolution:

First cell phones:
early cell phone

Cell phones now:
iPhone 7

Old Virtual Boy Set
Virtual boy

Will this be the future ???
Future Virtual Reality

We live in exciting times!

I remain respectfully yours,
~ Suzanne Piers, ZoHa Islands Blogger/Social Media

Ebbe Altberg Discusses Project Sansar

From an article on the blog UploadVR:

Nick Ochoa from Upload got the opportunity to sit down Linden Lab’s CEO Ebbe Altberg to discuss virtual reality. In development for two years now, Project Sansar essentially allows people to create virtual environments on a platform without all the technical know-how.

Sansar is being developed as a separate platform from Second Life, partly because Linden Lab could not get the frame rate up enough in Second Life to create a smooth and comfortable VR experience. Built from the ground up, Sansar enables users to create quality virtual experiences by taking care of horizontal capabilities such as hosting, social and monetary support. Ebbe says that Sansar is “built in the spirit of Second Life but doing quite a few things differently.”

Linden Lab is only a few weeks away from bringing aboard a few hand-picked test users, but they are still about six months from a beta program and about a year away from any sort of formal launch. Linden has plans for Sansar to be available on many devices, including mobile. In the words of Ebbe, Linden Labs is “trying to build a Platform that will last decades” in what he sees as the “final medium for creativity.”

I remain respectfully yours,
~ Suzanne Piers, ZoHa Islands Blogger/Social Media

Windows 10 and Second Life

Just a quick note about Windows 10 and SL compatibility:

After my post yesterday, a resident messaged me and told me they could not use SL after they upgraded to Windows 10. The first time after I upgraded to Windows 10, I also tried logging into SL without luck (I use Firestorm viewer).

However, what I discovered was that the graphics drivers have to be updated after you install Windows 10, and that is not something that Windows 10 prompts you to do. Apparently the upgrade rolls your graphics card drivers back to their original version. If you try Windows 10 and are not able to log in, try updating your graphics drivers and see if that makes a difference.

I remain respectfully yours,
~ Suzanne Piers, ZoHa Islands Blogger/Social Media

Windows 10 Privacy Concerns

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, I’m sure you are aware that the Windows 10 update has been released. Naturally, it isn’t without it’s flaws, and one of the biggest is the concerns about privacy. Many articles and blog posts have been written about the intrusion by Microsoft into your personal information, such as the one rumor flying around that Microsoft will use your computer (and thus your bandwidth) to send out updates to other users. Is there much ado about nothing, or does the public have some valid concerns? I upgraded to Windows 10 just a few days ago, and wish now that I’d read this before installing. But read on!

Ask Bob Rankin‘s blog tells about five things you must do now to protect your privacy on your Windows 10 OS.

If you allow Windows 10 to upgrade your existing system automatically, as I did, it will enable many default settings that you may not want enabled.

Bob discovered five privacy-related features you may want to tweak or disable. Here they are…I lifted this directly from the article, which you can find by clicking here: Do These 5 Things Now.

“Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO) is a peer-to-peer file distribution server, like a Bittorrent client, built right into Win 10. WUDO doesn’t just speed up delivery of Windows updates to you. Instead, pieces of the Win 10 installation and update files on your machine and/or local network may be distributed to other Win 10 users who need them.
Windows 10 Privacy settings

“Instead of investing in a global content-delivery system, Microsoft is using YOUR upload bandwidth to distribute its product! There’s no evidence that WUDO is a threat to your privacy or security, it’s just a bit icky. And who knows if it might not be subverted by Evil Hackers tomorrow?

“If you have a fast Internet connection (especially the upload speed), you’re a trusting soul, and you don’t mind facilitating the distribution of Windows 10 to your friends and neighbors, do nothing. But if you prefer to disable WUDO, follow these steps:
•Open the Start Menu
•Click or tap “Settings”
•Select “Update & security”
•In the left-side pane, select “Windows Update”
•In the right-side pane, select “Advanced options”
•In the new right-side pane that opens, select “Choose how updates are delivered”
•Move the slider control under “Updates from more than one place” to “OFF”

“WiFi Sense is a Win 10 (and Windows Phone) feature that I think is nonsense. It lets your contacts, Facebook “friends,” and Skype contacts share your WiFi network without knowing the network key. You get access to their WiFi networks, too. But I don’t want share my WiFi with all of those contacts, and WiFi Sense does not permit discrimination at the individual level. Also, if some of your contacts have your network key and use WiFi Sense, you may get total strangers using your WiFi.

“Fortunately, this feature is also optional. To learn more about WiFi Sense, and for instructions on how to disable it, see my article Is Windows 10 WiFi Sense Nonsense?

“Should you opt out of personalized ads? This one is tricky. With ad personalization turned on, Microsoft will try to show you the ads that are chosen ‘based on the sites that you visit, your online searches and more.’ Some find this useful, and some find it creepy, when they see ads for products directly related to web pages they’ve recently browsed. Turning off ad personalization won’t turn off ads, but it will ensure that the ads you see are completely unrelated to your interests. Again, Microsoft makes it easy to turn it off; just visit this link and toggle tracking “off” in your browser and on your Microsoft account, if you ever use one.

“But don’t think that ends the collection of data about your online or even offline activities. Consider what’s in the privacy policy linked at the bottom of the page:

” ‘Microsoft collects data to operate effectively and provide you the best experiences with our services. You provide some of this data directly, such as when you create a Microsoft account, submit a search query to Bing, speak a voice command to Cortana, upload a document to OneDrive, or contact us for support. We get some of it by recording how you interact with our services by, for example, using technologies like cookies, and receiving error reports or usage data from software running on your device. We also obtain data from third parties (including other companies).’

Cortana is a personal assistant built into Windows 10. It’s ability to respond to voice commands is similar to Siri on the iPhone, or the “OK Google” feature on Android phones. Some pundits believe that Cortana is the omnipresent, silent observer of everything you do, online or offline, reporting it back to Microsoft. I’m not so sure about that. But to disable Cortana and end the collection of data through it, type “cortana” in the search box and click on the first link in the search results (system settings). Then slide the off/on switch to “OFF”.

“Last but not least, wade through the 13 pages (yes, thirteen!) of Privacy Settings and turn off whatever seems appropriate. Type “privacy settings” in the search box to find the link to that system settings page.

“It’s a bit tedious to batten down the privacy hatches in Windows 10. But at least Microsoft makes it possible to do so. And remember, this isn’t just an issue with Microsoft. Most of the snooping (and perhaps more) that Windows 10 does is also done by Google and Facebook.

“Google recently implemented a Security and Privacy Dashboard that makes it fairly easy to understand and manage the related settings. But Facebook gives you few privacy controls, and obscures their privacy and data collection policies in a collection of documents containing over 20,000 words.

“Don’t get me wrong on Windows 10. For the most part, I’m very pleasantly surprised at how well the folks in Redmond reponded to the many (well deserved) criticisms of Windows 8. Win 10 is a huge improvement in usability, and will probably speed up your computing. But information is power, and it’s better to have that power in your hands. Take a few minutes to review and tweak your Windows 10 privacy settings.”

I hope you find this information helpful.

I remain respectfully yours,
~ Suzanne Piers, ZoHa Islands Blogger/Social Media

PaleoQuest: Second Life’s Dinosaur Adventure!

As most of you know, I’m a huge MadPea fan. But recently I’ve discovered a Linden Lab created game that was just opened called PaleoQuest. It’s a skill game (along the same lines as MadPea but certainly not to their level). I started it tonight and couldn’t make it through the First Quest; I kept getting killed. It’s getting late so I will try again another day. However it’s fun and interesting, and I need to figure out how to avoid the traps. Meanwhile, I encourage you to try it out for yourself. I strongly recommend you use the game settings they suggest — it makes a difference. And of course, the game takes advantage of the Experience Keys — one click to allow the HUD and game to control your avatar and no more clicking.

The Story behind PaleoQuest

Here’s the notecard that is given about PaleoQuest:

PaleoQuest Game Play:

Welcome to PaleoQuest. This is a fully interactive game, where you can take part in adventurous quests, collect various common and rare objects to help Magellan close the time anomalies, avoid perils, dinosaurs, and foil Dr Talpa’s evil plans to take over the grid! Receive prizes and L$ rewards for your bravery!

Game settings:

Please use the regions Windlight settings (Select World > Sun > Use Region Settings).
The game is best viewed at maximum draw distance. (Select Me > Preferences > Graphics > Draw Distance > Set to 512).
Please turn your animation override OFF.
Standard sized avatars are recommended.

Game play:

Welcome to PaleoQuest. This is a fully interactive game, where you can take part in various quests, and earn L$ or prize rewards.


When you first land in PaleoQuest, a HUD will automatically attach to you. The HUD shows you:

– Current game information and clues.
– How many common and rare collectible objects you have collected.
– Which Artifact quests you have completed.
– Hands out a help notecard.
– Has a mute button, in case you wish to mute the audio clues that the HUD plays.

Visitor Center:

The first building you enter is the Visitor Center.
Here you will find:

– Game information.
– A tutorial video to play.
– A background story video.
– Paying out stations.

Paying Out Stations:

– The Paying Out Stations are located in the left and right wings of the Visitor Center, and are clearly sign posted.
– Here you can REDEEM your Collectible objects (FOR L$) and completed Artifact quests (FOR L$ OR A RANDOM PRIZE).
– Prizes are given out randomly from the Prize Payout Station, and are tradeable.
– Please rez your prizes on a sandbox, or on your own land.


– Stairs to the monorail are located at the sides of the entrance to the visitor Center.
– Follow the signs to the monorail start platform.
– Ride the monorail to take a tour of all the regions.
– At each monorail stop, there are quests to play.
– Touch the quest information signs to find out what the quest for that region is.
– If the Monorail is not working, please use the Teleport Pads to go from stop to stop.

Daily Collectible Quests:

– Once you leave the start region, each region has a series of common and rare objects to collect.
– Blue = common; Pink = rare.
– Rare objects are located in the most dangerous places.
– You can carry a maximum of 99 common and rare objects.
– When you are carrying the maximum amount of objects, you need to return to the Visitor Center to hand them in for L$ rewards.
– Stand on the “Collectible Payout Stations” to automatically get a payout for your objects.
– You cannot hand in FEWER than 20 common or rare objects.
– You can hand in a maximum of 200 common blue objects, and 100 rare pink objects, per day.

Weekly Artifact Quests:

– There are 5 regions where you can take part in Artifact Quests, and collect artifacts.
– Depart from each Monorail stop, and click on the quest sign to find out what you have to do for each quest.
– If you find a key object to complete a quest, and it attaches to you, DO NOT DETACH IT UNTIL YOU COMPLETE THE QUEST.
– Once you have completed the first quest, the icon lights up on your HUD.
– Each Artifact Quest needs to be completed in consecutive order. Completing the first quest gains you access to the second quest, and so on…
– Once all 5 artifact quests have been completed, and all icons are lit up on your HUD, you may return to the Visitor Center, and can then choose a L$ reward, or a random prize, by standing on the relevant platform.
– You can complete the Artifact Quests (must be in consecutive order) once a week.


– When you die, you get teleported to the nearest resurrection circle.
– You lose everything you have collected.
– You do not lose any artifact quest progress.


The following scenarios will result in players being moved to a Resurrection circle:
– Flying.
– Moving faster than the standard Second Life run speed.
– Being idle for over 9 minutes.

Tip and tricks:

– PaleoQuest is a game involving skill.
– Take your time, observe your timing, walk, jump, run, look around carefully, and listen.
– Remember to always watch your step.
– Always read the text messages on your HUD.
– There are also audio messages, and signs to touch for more information.
– If your audio message repeats, click on the mute button on your HUD, and then unclick it.
– Sometimes it is better to complete the quests, and then collect the collectibles afterwards.

To get started, please watch the videos, and then make your way to the Monorail start platform. Stairs to the monorail start platform are located behind you, and are clearly signposted. Your adventure awaits!

Here are some photos I took:

Entering the area

Entering the area

The portal to enter the game.

The portal to enter the game.

Entering the Visitor Center

Entering the Visitor Center

The Monorail that takes you to the quests.

The Monorail that takes you to the quests.

Make sure you get on the Monorail at the Start Gate.

Make sure you get on the Monorail at the Start Gate.

The Monorail and surrounding views.

The Monorail and surrounding views.

Dino Falls

Dino Falls

Here’s the SLURL to the Portal Park. Find the PaleoQuest entrance, and off you go!

Click here: Portal Park — PaleoQuest


I remain respectfully yours,
~ Suzanne Piers, ZoHa Islands Blogger/Social Media